How I create lesson plans on my interactive whiteboard

30 December 2014 | reading time: 3 minutes

Wow!  I have so many lessons filed away in Gynzy this year (after just over one year of use).  I use it daily for math and reading, and occasionally for ALL other subjects.   I have saved 167 math lessons on there, 162 Reading lessons, 24 miscellaneous book lessons (some by chapter, some by book), 17 English lessons, 33 history lessons, 9 Science/Health lessons,   8 Bible lessons, 3 Bullying lessons, and some other miscellaneous lessons.  I worked primarily on math and reading over last year and am adding the other subjects more this year.

PDF to interactive

Since last year, I have learned how to put videos and PDF files into Gynzy. Our Bible curriculum, for example, has loads of charts and posters to use. I have always found it inconvenient to search through the posters to find the one for today’s lesson, but now, I can upload the entire pdf file of the posters and charts (which came with the curriculum in the Teacher’s Toolkit) and I can find the poster/chart I need in a matter of seconds.

Reading lessons

The same holds true for the transparencies that came with our reading curriculum.

My students have become accustomed to the format I use on here for reading.  We have “Enrichment Words, Service Words, and Review Words” at the start of each lesson.  I typed these into Gynzy for every lesson, so now our lesson automatically starts there. When there is word work to do, instead of having to write everything on the board (every year), that comes up automatically now, too (after I’ve typed it all in) and we work through that part of the lesson, as well.

Math Lessons

I think I use Gynzy the most for math, though.  Using all the manipulatives that are on there has made everything so much easier for me! And much more hands-on for my kiddos! EVERYONE can see what I am doing- not just the students on the front row. And using Gynzy on my white board gives those wiggly students a chance to get out of their seats once in a while when they come to the board to select something or work a problem. I think the manipulatives I use daily in math are: the 100 chart, the clock, flashcards,and the timer (for speed drills).

This year, I have my students keeping a math journal, where they write down information and/or steps for solving problems so they can reference back. All of this is typed up neatly in Gynzy so it is easy for them to copy.  But another great feature is I can print a screen (or 2 or 3), so if I have a student who is absent, I can print what they need and put it with their work for the day to help them when they do it.

Writing Lessons

When I want to write a story with the class, I can write it up in Gynzy, and save it to work on (for revising and proofreading) in future lessons.  They get to see these processes in real-time using the green and red “pens” I teach them to use in their own writing.

I have found that my laptop works much more easily with Gynzy than the iPads did, so I bring my laptop from home every day and use it.  It is not jumpy like it was with the iPad and dragging things around has been far more responsive with the laptop.

Overall, after having used Gynzy for over a year now, I feel the expense is well worth it!  It has been a huge time saver for me, and a big help for my students!

By |2018-07-02T20:40:43+00:0030 December 2014|Tips & Tricks|

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